EU leaders are expected to unite on a tough opening negotiating stance on Brexit at a special summit in Brussels

Ilinca Tanase
By Ilinca Tanase aprilie 29, 2017 13:55

EU leaders are expected to unite on a tough opening negotiating stance on Brexit at a special summit in Brussels

PRESS REVIEW – The Guardian: EU leaders set to take tough stance in special Brexit summit. The Independent: Theresa May says the 27 EU countries are ‘lining up to oppose’ Brexit Britain – has she forgotten that that’s how a union works? The Guardian: Weak pound melts the British dream of a place in the sun.

The Guardian: EU leaders set to take tough stance in special Brexit summit

Leaders of EU27 are expected to demand that UK resolves key divorce issues before any talks on future trade deal can begin Donald Tusk speaks to the media as he arrives for a special European summit in Brussels.

EU leaders are expected to unite on a tough opening negotiating stance on Brexit at a special summit in Brussels on Saturday, when they will agree on whether to make Britain settle potential payments to the bloc before considering a new trade deal.

The heads of the remaining 27 countries will demand that Britain resolves the key divorce issues of citizens’ rights, the divorce bill and the border on the island of Ireland before any talks on a future trade deal between the UK and the EU can begin.

Donald Tusk, the president of the European council, whose members comprise the EU states, said on Saturday: “We all want a close and strong future relationship with the UK. There’s absolutely no question about it. But before discussing the future, we have to sort out our past. We will handle it with genuine care, but firmly. This is, I think, the only possible way to move forward.

“We also need solid guarantees for all citizens and their families who will be affected by Brexit, on both sides. This must be the number one priority for the EU and the UK.”

The EU has taken some confidence from the fact that the British prime minister has not recently repeated her claim that “no deal is better than a bad deal”, despite being pushed to do so by politicians in favour of a so-called hard Brexit.

The Independent: Theresa May says the 27 EU countries are ‘lining up to oppose’ Brexit Britain – has she forgotten that that’s how a union works?

Here’s some perspective from a marginal Leave voter from last June (me). In the longer run it will be good for the UK to drop its illusions about Europe – and that counts for Remainer illusions as well as Brexiteer ones. The EU is an unreformable nightmare – but we will suffer the negative consequences of leaving for possibly decades to come
Theresa May says the 27 EU countries are ‘lining up to oppose’ Brexit Britain – has she forgotten that that’s how a union works?

I know she enjoys high poll ratings, I suspect mainly because of the opposition she faces – but the Prime Minister certainly has made herself look uncharacteristically naive and foolish with her remarks about EU countries preparing to „line up to oppose us” over Brexit.

I mean, what on earth does she expect? Does she think that they will just turn round and say, “Sure, have a free trade deal, free access to the single market, special treatment for your car industry and the City of London, yes of course you can keep the two EU agencies you’ve got in the UK, you can do what you want with the Irish border and you can just leave us a tenner for the ‘divorce’ bill – and obviously we’ll accept without let or hindrance any British nationals wishing to come and work or start a business over here or British companies or banks wanting to buy their way back into the single market. Will that be all, or would you like us to send you some more Mercedes, BMWs and Audis free of charge too, just for old time’s sake?”.

The Guardian: Weak pound melts the British dream of a place in the sun

Brits abroad? Not so many, it seems. Uncertainty about the future of Britain in Europe and the fall in the value of the pound are taking their toll on the number of UK buyers investing in a little place in the Mediterranean sun. Before the EU referendum a €300,000 villa in Spain would have cost a UK buyer £229,000. Now it would set them back £254,000.

A report by Spain’s Association of Land and Commercial Registrars last week revealed British demand for second homes in Spain was down nearly 30% on last year’s pre-referendum levels.

In Greece, where property taxes have soared amid the debt-stricken economy and there are lingering fears that the country could yet be ejected from the eurozone, estate agents on some of the more popular Greek islands are reporting an even bigger plunge in the number of Britons looking for homes since the Brexit vote. British nationals accounted for 19% of all house transactions involving foreigners in Spain in 2016, down from 38% in 2008

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